Ameliorate

Word of the day  

mitigate

Definition: v.tr. make milder or less intense or severe; moderate (your offer certainly mitigated their hostility).
Synonyms: extenuate, palliate
Etymology: ME f. L mitigare mitigat- f. mitis mild (more...)

Quote of the day  

Let him who would enjoy a good future waste none of his present.
by Roger Babson

Birthday of the day  

Sigismund von Herberstein

Siegmund (Sigismund) Freiherr von Herberstein, (or Baron Sigismund von Herberstein), (August 23, 1486 – March 28, 1566) was an Carniolan diplomat, writer, historian and member of the Holy Roman Empire Imperial Council. He was most noted for his extensive writing on the geography, history and customs of Russia and contributed greatly to early Western European knowledge of that area.

Joke of the day  

A young child walked up to her mother and stared at her hair. As mother scrubbed on the dishes, the girl cleared her throat and sweetly asked, 'Why do you have some grey strands in your hair?' The mother paused and looked at her daughter. 'Every time you disobey, I get one strand of grey hair. If you want me to stay pretty, you better obey.' The mother quickly returned to her task of washing dishes. The little girl stood there thinking. She cleared her throat again. 'Mother?' She sweetly asked again. 'Yes?' Her Mother replied. 'Why is Grandma's hair all grey?'

Thought of the day  

Once we hold a belief, it tends to stick with us for the rest of our lives, unless we challenge it.

Fact of the day  

30 BC – After the successful invasion of Egypt, Octavian executes Marcus Antonius Antyllus, eldest son of Marc Antony, and Caesarion, the last king of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt and only child of Caesar and Cleopatra.
 

Biography of the day  

Archibald Cox

Archibald Cox (17 May 1912-29 May 2004), distinguished lawyer, Harvard Law professor, U.S. solicitor general, and Watergate special prosecutor, was born Archibald Cox, Jr., in Plainfield, New Jersey, the oldest child of the prominent New York lawyer Archibald Cox, Sr., and Frances 'Fanny' Perkins. Young 'Archie' spent much of his childhood at the estate of his mother's family in Windsor, Vermont, a wooded retreat established by his great-grandfather William M. Evarts. Evarts, a descendant of the founding founder Roger Sherman, was a renowned nineteenth-century lawyer who had represented President Andrew Johnson in his impeachment trial (1868) and an independent-minded statesman who served as U.S. attorney general, secretary of state, and senator from New York. This family history entwined with law and public service influenced Archie from his earliest days.

Article of the day  

John Sherman Cooper

John Sherman Cooper (1901–1991) was an American politician, jurist, and diplomat. He began his political career in the Kentucky House of Representatives (1927–29) before being elected as a county judge in 1930. After serving in the U.S. Army in World War II and reorganizing the Bavarian judicial system after Germany's defeat, he was a Kentucky circuit judge before winning election to the U.S. Senate in 1946. He was defeated in the 1948 election, but re-elected to partial terms in 1952 and 1956, serving as Ambassador to India in between. He was re-elected to the Senate in 1960 and 1966 by record margins for Kentucky. President John F. Kennedy chose Cooper to conduct a secret fact-finding mission to Moscow and New Delhi. Following Kennedy's assassination in November 1963, President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed Cooper to the Warren Commission to investigate the assassination. Cooper soon became an outspoken opponent of Johnson's decision to escalate U.S. military involvement in the Vietnam War. Aging and increasingly deaf, Cooper did not seek re-election in 1972. His last acts of public service were as Ambassador to East Germany from 1974 to 1976 and as an alternate delegate to the United Nations in 1981.

Did you know

  • that when a member of the Royal Commission on Local Government in England in 1966-69, Derek Senior wrote a memorandum of dissent as long as the report itself?
  • that despite his father calling him 'the flower of my fleet', Fleetwood Pellew (pictured) still managed to provoke two mutinies and spent thirty years on half-pay?
  • that D. Bennett Mazur was elected in 1991 to serve a sixth term in the New Jersey General Assembly representing the 37th Legislative District, but resigned after suffering a stroke on Election Day?
  • that in 1899 Isaac Seneca became the first Native American to be named as an All-American football player while playing halfback for the Carlisle Indian School?