Ameliorate

Word of the day  

endeavour

Definition: v. & n. tr. (foll. by to infin.) try earnestly.
Synonyms: enterprise, endeavor
Etymology: ME f. put oneself in DEVOIR (more...)

Quote of the day  

For disappearing acts, it's hard to beat what happens to the eight hours supposedly left after eight of sleep and eight of work.
by Doug Larson

Birthday of the day  

Isabella I of Castile

Isabella I (Spanish: Isabel I, Ysabel, Galician: Sabela I) (22 April 1451 – 26 November 1504) was Queen of Castile and León. She and her husband Ferdinand II of Aragon brought stability to both kingdoms that became the basis for the unification of Spain. Later the two laid the foundation for the political unification of Spain under their grandson, Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor.

Joke of the day  

A man and his wife were sitting in the living room discussing a 'Living Will'. The man said 'Just so you know, I never want to live in a vegetative state, dependent on some machine and fluids from a bottle. If that ever happens, just pull the plug.' His wife got up, unplugged the TV and threw out all the beer.

Thought of the day  

Most people are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.

Fact of the day  

238 – Year of the Six Emperors: The Roman Senate outlaws emperor Maximinus Thrax for his bloodthirsty proscriptions in Rome and nominates two of its members, Pupienus and Balbinus, to the throne.
 

Biography of the day  

George Boole

George Boole [bu?l], (November 2, 1815 - December 8, 1864) was a British mathematician and philosopher. As the inventor of Boolean algebra, the basis of all modern computer arithmetic, Boole is regarded in hindsight as one of the founders of the field of computer science, although computers did not exist in his day. Boolean algebra was also used in the development of information retrieval, a major subfield of information science.

Article of the day  

two-cent piece

The two-cent piece was produced by the U.S. Mint for circulation from 1864 to 1872 and for collectors in 1873. It was designed by James B. Longacre. The economic turmoil of the American Civil War caused government-issued coins, even the non-silver Indian Head cent, to vanish from circulation, hoarded by the public. One means of filling this gap was private token issues, often made of bronze. The cent at that time was struck of a copper-nickel alloy. The piece was difficult for the Philadelphia Mint to strike, and Mint officials, as well as the annual Assay Commission, recommended the coin's replacement. Despite opposition from those wishing to keep the metal nickel in the coinage, Congress passed the Coinage Act of 1864, authorizing bronze cents and two-cent pieces. Although initially popular in the absence of other federal coinage, the two-cent piece's place in circulation was later usurped by the three-cent piece and the nickel. There were decreasing mintages each year, and it was abolished by the Mint Act of 1873. Large quantities were redeemed by the government and melted. Nevertheless, two-cent pieces remain inexpensive by the standards of 19th-century American coinage.

Did you know

  • that paraplegic handcyclist Edward Maalouf is the only person to have won medals for Lebanon at the Paralympic Games?
  • that the upcoming release Joe Danger: The Movie is a video game that parodies various Hollywood film scenes?
  • that Harold Bell co-created Woodsy Owl (pictured), mascot of the United States Forest Service, on the set of the television series Lassie?
  • that the Journal of Contemporary Religion, covering new religious movements and trends in mainstream religion, was founded in 1985 as Religion Today, with Peter B. Clarke as its founding editor?